psychoPEDIA: Inside the Outpost

Album Review:
Nat Baldwin's Most Valuable Player

The feeling people work so hard for, and sacrifice so much for, is the feeling of accomplishment, winning, knowing you're the best, knowing it'll be okay, and overall euphoria. I get a fine share of all the previously listed feelings when I put on Most Valuable Player. It is peace of mind itself.

Most Valuable Player's vibe gives you that feeling when you are looking out the window of your car as you drive by a deserted field, whose only inhabitant is the wind. Nat Baldwin - the vox of it all - has a most unique voice. The only comparison I can make to his voice is that of Robert Smith of The Cure, minus the accent, and the towering, misplaced hair. It has Robert Smith's male calming effect, but there is a major difference. Nat Baldwin sings in many tones, groans, and uncommon sounds. It sounds almost foreign, as if speaking in tongues.

This has a plus side though; these hymns and tones have a relaxing effect, as does that of a mother hymning her baby to sleep. Backed by either a trumpet, or clarinet in all but a few songs, it seems orchestrated. This only adds to the successful feeling like the slow-motion moments of people crossing the finish line, or "We Are the Champions" by Queen. When you listen to this, you have won. Just like the title of the CD, you are just that; you're the Most Valuable Player and you've got it all.

~Patrick Chamberland

Patrick Chamberland is a 14 year-old, freshman in high school. He lives in the most northern point of Maine.

Most Valuable Player will be released April 29 on Broken Sparrow Records.

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Album Review:
Marilyn Manson's Eat Me Drink Me

I know that music is one big influence-- One that can change your mood from song to song. This album's influence on me is that of co-dependence. In just about every song it seems like he is talking about a certain girl or drug. Something he needs to continue on and function, something he needs to remain alive. Which of course is not the case, but in the mind of a co-dependent it is. We all have this in a way I think, maybe even just a tiny bit. With titles like “Putting Holes In Happiness,” I get the impression that he's saying he'd never be happy without that object. In a way Eat Me Drink Me sounds like the predictable Manson, full of anguish and his home-hitting bitter looks on life that make you say to yourself, "I couldn't agree more." Messages that he sends are clearer in this album, as if he is more of a story-teller; a story teller trying to warn his listeners about the dangers and fears of the world. Eat Me Drink Me sounds different to me here because compared to his other albums, he isn't drowned out by the rest of the band-- his lyrics are clearer. This changes the whole outlook of what the listener interprets of the song’s meaning.

Going back to the co-dependent vibe-- Eat Me Drink Me sounds like it’s about his personal experiences in life, painful ones full of mistakes. The popular hit "Heart Shaped Glasses" seems to be a good example of this when you listen to the lyrics: "Don't break, don't break my heart/ and I won't break your heart-shaped glasses/ little girl, little girl you should close your eyes." It sounds as if he is talking to a girl, telling her not go hurt him because he's easily hurt. But she has these metaphoric "heart-shaped glasses," which say that she isn't hurt that easily, because the sunglasses are used as protection-- and since they're the heart-shaped, this means that she doesn't take things as deeply. But if she hurts him, he'll make her vulnerable. That's what this song says to me.

Eat Me Drink Me also speaks to me, mostly of despair and of co-dependence in different situations. For every song the story seems to change, but the punch-line is still right in your face. It is a lonely-sounding CD which sounds sort of painful with its low, depressing tones and synths. On the other hand it can speak to you deeply, like it does to me at some points. Music tells stories and Manson happens to be a genius at it. He is great for being able to write these stories that I think everybody can relate to. And if no relations are made, that's also fine-- because his lewd, crude, and surprising stories entertain. That’s why I recommend this album.

~Patrick Chamberland

Patrick Chamberland is a 14 year-old, freshman in high school. He lives in the most northern point of Maine.

Watch Marilyn Manson's Video for "Heart-Shaped Glasses"

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